A 1st D&D Campaign Handout

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Ugh… finally got this done! This took me way too long to get done (my excuse is I got caught up in world buildingĀ  šŸ˜€ ).

I’m posting it here so those who are curious about it can see it, & also so I can free myself for other pursuits. Fair warning – it’s a long read (over six pages long, way too big to paste into a blog post).

To summarize the document, it covers:

  • What to expect from me as a DM.
  • What the setting is + some lore regarding what your character should know from the get go.
  • Some house rules, mainly about leveling.
  • What I’ll need from players.

If you feel up for it (& can open Word documents) here it is.

Farewell.

April Update – D&D World Building

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Hello, I’m still around.

I’ve taken this past week off from work so I’ve been able to just relax at home. It’s given me the chance to refresh things: change my bed, get new clothes, shave, etc. Though probably the main thing I’ve been doing over the past while is trying to create a D&D campaign setting.

I’ll just say right now that it’s a “homage” (er, blatant rip-off) of the fantasy I’ve grown up with & enjoyed. With standard D&D lore as the baseline, I’m taking elements primarily from Heroes of Might & Magic, Warhammer Fantasy, Warcraft, The Elder Scrolls, & more; with names, items, etc taken from Magic: The Gathering, Heretic & Hexen, Lords of Magic, Diablo, & other media. It’s essentially a kitchen sink full of high fantasy, which allows the players to be whatever they want to be (this is the one campaign where I’m taking this approach by the way, I plan on being more original/restrictive in future campaigns).

Is this copyright infringement? Probably, but I’m only doing this with my friends & it’s just for fun.

I am of course adding my own flavour to the setting, things like:

  • No explicit “good & evil”, only perspectives, beliefs, & cultural values. That means creatures like goblins & orcs aren’t just pillaging & destroying “cause they’re evil”, it’s part of how they survive in the world. It also makes entities like angels & demons more interesting since these are meant to be the living essence of such moral forces.
  • Deities are ambiguous & every faction has their own idea of what the gods are; no universal pantheon. Clerics & the like are functionally the same but their powers come more from faith in the domain & ideals themselves; they’re the ultimate examples of the “power of belief”.

I started this thinking that I’d create the world in a simplistic manner; I won’t worry about things makings sense or there being consistent logic, this is fantasy for fantasy sake. Though as I’ve dug into this & added more & more, I realize just how much work I need to do. Continue reading